Monthly Archives: December 2011

2011: The year Mormonism went mainstream

The National Post (in Canada) has a relatively positive article about the Church that was in the paper on December 26, 2011, and is also on their web site:

Something happened to Mormons in 2011: They got popular, gained cachet and became, well, cool.

Long thought of as outsiders, followers of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints are enjoying a newfound acceptability and their church’s profile has risen in politics, theatre and sports.

“This is really a wonderful American story,” says Jon Butler, a professor of religious history at Yale University. “Mormons were always seen as very different. Now they’ve become just other Christians. They’ve become as interesting as Presbyterians.

“[In 2011] people began to say, ‘We have something to learn from these Mormons.’ ”

Christmas Subway Art

My wife is really into “subway” art right now. To me, that sounds like graffiti, but to her it means signs where there are a bunch of words that take up an entire page. It’s hard to describe, but if you don’t know what it looks like, do a Google Image Search for subway art and you’ll see what I mean.

My kids love Star Wars (original trilogy, prequel trilogy, Clone Wars, etc), and I recently came across a blog that happened to be Mormon where the creator has made all sorts of crafts that are Star Wars related. I looked around the site, and she had also posted a beautiful subway art print that is of Isaiah 9: 6. You know… the scripture that goes:

For unto us a child is born, unto us a son is given: and the government shall be upon his shoulder: and his name shall be called Wonderful, Counsellor, The mighty God, The everlasting Father, The Prince of Peace.

Anyway, you can see the subway art of that scripture here.

Philadelphia’s Mormon Temple: An Affront to Modernism

The Philadelphia Weekly Press has a mostly positive article about the new temple being built there. It’s worth a read:

When it comes to church or temple architecture, Mormons have it all over Catholics and mega-church Protestants, whose modern churches frequently overemphasize cold, hard lines and sterility.

The proposed Mormon temple at 18th and Vine Streets near the Philadelphia Parkway won’t be a utilitarian warehouse. The design is one of many temple designs currently in use throughout the Mormon world. Currently there are 133 Mormon Temples in operation. When the Philadelphia Temple is completed, that number will rank in the high 130s. The Temple will have two spires, one hosting an image of the Angel Moroni, the angel whom, according to Mormon belief, appeared to Mormon founder Joseph Smith in Palmyra, New York, sometime after Smith asked God which church he should join.