Tag Archives: Mormon

A good clean joke?

Recently I was in a second hand store and was browsing the books. I was flipping through The Best of the Good Clean Jokes by Bob Phillips and happened to come across one related to Mormons. It makes a joke about polygamy. It may be clean, but

A Mormon acquaintance once pushed Mark Twain into an argument on the issue of polygamy. After long and tedious expositions justifying the practice, the Mormon demanded that Twain cite any passage of Scripture expressly forbidding polygamy.

“Nothing easier,” Twain replied. “No man can serve two masters.”

“Mormon mommies have the best blogs”

I’m sure many of you have seen this by now, but recently the Toronto Star had an article about how Mormon “mommy blogs” are among the most popular of that category of blogs. The general thinking is that family is important to us, and Mormon moms can be quite crafty. Lots of non-Mormon women apparently like this.

It’s an interesting read. Check it out at the Toronto Star website.

“The #Blessed Life Of Kaskade, EDM’s Voice Of Reason”

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Buzzfeed has a great article about Ryan Raddon, AKA Kaskade. He is a world-famous DJ, and is also a devout Mormon. I’m not into that type of music, so I hadn’t heard of him before, but it was a very interested read.

I’ve since looked up his name and there are lots of Mormon-related articles about him.

“Confessions of a Mormon housewife”

This was all over the news a week or two ago, but in case any of you missed it…

CNN has a show called This is Life with Lisa Ling. Recently there was an episode where a Mormon mother spoke about her struggle with prescription drug abuse.

Why Don’t Mormons Recite the Lord’s Prayer?

This isn’t something I’ve spent much time thinking about, but Religion News Service has an interesting posting about why Mormons don’t use the Lord’s Prayer.

I remember reciting the Lord’s Prayer in elementary school (before it was decided that you couldn’t do that anymore). As a young kid, I didn’t think at all about what the words meant. I rarely come across the Lord’s prayer now as an adult. Since I’ve been a Mormon my entire life, I don’t really see how reciting it is helpful to people. The comparison is made to some of our ordinances having set wording, but the difference is just that… that it is an ordinance prayer, not just a “regular” prayer.

To me it is just like a lot of things with religion. If you feel the Spirit and feel closer to God, then go for it. If it doesn’t help you, then try something else.

183rd Semiannual General Conference – Pre-conference notes

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Life has gotten in the way of my blogging over the last month and a half, but I’m definitely going to get some postings up this weekend about General Conference. It seems that most times I’m at work for one of the sessions, but this weekend I’m off, so I’m going to watch all conference sessions at home. This will also include the Priesthood Session. My father and I talked about it, and we think we’ll watch this one and April’s conference at home, and then when my son is 12 for next October’s conference, we’ll go to the Church so he has that tradition of going out with us.

I have no insight whatsoever into what will be shared this weekend, but I assume that much of the same themes we’ve heard in other meetings this year will be continued. The Work of Salvation, along with strengthening families will be hot topics for sure.

Enjoy the conference!


Read the recaps and other notes from the 183rd Semiannual General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints:

A dying Apostle’s testimony

I, like many of you, follow quite a few Mormon blogs. Ardis over at Keepaptichinin always has fascinating historical postings. A couple of months ago she posted something about President Joseph Fielding Smith’s last testimony. There is a line in his remarks where he says:

Now, my young friends, as I stand at the edge of eternity, I want you to know that in my many years on the earth, I have found great joy and happiness.

Who knows if he really knew he would die shortly after making those remarks, but in hindsight he certainly seems to foresee it.

That made me think of other final testimonies. Perhaps the most “famous” one was from Bruce R McConkie. He spoke in April 1985 General Conference and said this (and then passed away two weeks later):

I am one of his witnesses, and in a coming day I shall feel the nail marks in his hands and in his feet and shall wet his feet with my tears.
But I shall not know any better then than I know now that he is God’s Almighty Son, that he is our Savior and Redeemer, and that salvation comes in and through his atoning blood and in no other way.

Maybe it’s just me, but it almost seemed like President Boyd K Packer was saying goodbye during the Work of Salvation broadcast. I wonder how much time he has left.

I still have very much to learn. I don’t know how long I’ll be learning for, but when it’s over I’ll go to the new realm and being a new school. I express my testimony to you that the Lord lives, that the restoration is true, that it was managed and determined beyond the veil for our benefit. I know the Lord lives, and I know the Lord.

Most charitable states in America

There was recently a report about the most charitable states in America. Not too surprisingly Utah was number 1.

Utah, home to the nation’s biggest Mormon population, is also the most charitable state, according to the Chronicle of Philanthropy’s most recent report that looks at giving as a percentage of discretionary income — your income excluding essential expenses.

Mormons are supposed to tithe at least 10 percent of their income to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and the median donation among Utah households lines up with that requirement — amounting to $5,255 per household, or 10.6 percent of discretionary income.

On the one hand it’s interesting that the entire population, on average, pays 10% in charitable donations. This just happens to be what tithing is. On the other hand, I’m sure there are people who think that people should be giving to causes other than the Church.

If you read the entire article, and follow some of the links, the findings are quite interesting. Generally speaking, it seems that the more religious an area is, the more they donate. It also mentions that New Hampshire has a fairly high average income, but has the lowest donation rate.

183rd Annual General Conference – Pre-conference notes

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Here we are at another April, and General Conference is here. I’m not sure how this happened again, but I’m working today, so I’ll have to watch the first session while at work. I think I’ve worked 5 out of the last 6 conferences (or something like that). Otherwise, the plan is the same as last time. We’ll watch the other general sessions at home, and I’ll go with my father to the Priesthood session broadcast at Church. Since I’m now the YM President, I’m also in charge of our “sub-sational” that we have beforehand. Even though we are eating, I’m sure my father and I will find some excuse to still go out together afterward.

I have no predictions about anything. The stats will be interesting. This is the first General Conference since the big “Mormon Moment” (Mitt Romney’s bid for the White House, the Book of Mormon musical, etc). That moment seems to be passing, so it will be interesting to see if it led to increased baptisms. It will also be interesting to hear how many missionaries are currently serving.

Enjoy the conference!


Read the recaps and other notes from the 183rd Annual General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints:

Mormon Church buys ads in Book of Mormon programme

I’m sure this has been done in many cities where the “Book of Mormon” musical is being presented, but this one is very close to home (I live about an hour away from Toronto).

From the Toronto Star:

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints hopes patrons who see the runaway hit stage musical The Book of Mormon when it lands in Toronto next month will also check out the scripture that inspired it.

The church, which has no involvement in the frequently blasphemous religious satire, has bought three full-page ads in the Mirvish Productions programme for the show to encourage theatregoers to read the actual Book of Mormon.

“You’ve seen the play . . . now read the book,” says one ad.

“I’ve read the book,” reads another.

“The book is always better,” concludes a third.